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I'd recommend avoiding shellfish such as oysters, scallops and mussels in summer (ie. when there's NOT an R in the month). The actual flesh is fine, however there's often a lot of roe in them, and the real problem is massively increased levels of nasty bacteria which which give you very bad stomach problems if not cooked properly. Some people are also allergic to them, a colleague of mine is allergic to scallops.

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Any fish with a risk of Ciguatera.

This is associated with consumption of contaminated reef fish such as barracuda, grouper, and snapper. Under-diagnosis and under-reporting (especially in endemic areas such as the Caribbean) make it difficult to know the true worldwide incidence of the Marine Toxin Diseases. At least 50,000 people per year who live in or visit tropical and subtropical areas suffer from Ciguatera worldwide. For example, CDC and others estimate that only 2-10% of Ciguatera cases are actually reported in the United States. In the US Virgin Islands, there are an estimated 300 cases per 10,000 or 3% of the population per year; a similar rate is found in the French West Indies. In St. Thomas, a household survey estimated that 4.4% of all households suffered from Ciguatera annually (at least 2640 persons per year or an annual incidence of 600 cases per year); in Puerto Rico, 7% of the residents have experienced at least one episode of Ciguatera in their lifetime.

 

Ciguatera, especially in the Caribbean, suffer for weeks to months with debilitating neurologic symptoms, including profound weakness, temperature sensation changes, pain, and numbness in the extremities. The dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus produces ciguatoxin throughout tropical regions of the world.

 

 

Look at : http://www.whoi.edu/redtide/illness/ciguat..._poisoning.html for more info.

 

 

Tony

Tony

 

After a certain age, if you don't wake up aching in every joint, you are probably dead.

 

 

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dolphins dont seem to be enjoyed by the british ,mind you now its just tuna in tuna cans theres no flavour.

Believe NOTHING anyones says or writes unless you witness it yourself and even then your eyes can deceive you

None of this "the enemy of my enemy is my friend" crap it just means i have at least two enemies!

 

There is only one opinion i listen to ,its mine and its ALWAYS right even when its wrong

 

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Grangers law : anything i say will  turn out the opposite or not happen at all!

 

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Any fish with a risk of Ciguatera.

 

Good one, mate.

The coast of Queensland, especially the Great Barrier Reef, is noted for ciguatera, yet ciguatera does not appear elsewhere in Australia. The mackerel, coral trout and like species are known to carry the poison, but as most people are aware of it, there are very few cases reported. The Qld government has issued a pamphlet naming the worst carriers i.e. red bass, chinaman and paddletail and placed these fish on the protected list.

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Cheers, Bobj.

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The Qld government has issued a pamphlet naming the worst carriers i.e. red bass, chinaman and paddletail and placed these fish on the protected list.

 

Red bass - ah yes, that takes me back to my first trip to Oz in 1988

 

This first trip to Australia was to meet Norma’s family, who lived in Queensland at the time. A grand family gathering was organised, including a Great Feast – a rite of passage into the clan for me.

 

Norma’s sister-in-law was a cardiac nurse. When the end result of a high cholesterol, high alcohol, heavy smoking, high stress, typically Australian life-style was brought in to her hospital, either the patient snuffed it, or recovered to find a nice young lady (aforesaid sister-in-law) holding his hand and telling him that he was still alive. Naturally such patients were usually extremely grateful, and nursie often got showered with presents. One of these presents was a large red fish caught by one of the patients during his convalescence. It was called a "Red Snapper" and kept in the freezer until we arrived to attend the family gathering with its customary Great Feast.

 

It so happened that I had done some extensive homework on Queensland fish, and was pretty confident I could recognise quite a few of them. When the fish was defrosted I examined it. It was not a Red Snapper, but a Red Bass, Lutjanus bohar , well known as potentially ciguatoxic. I said so. It was not a wise move.

 

Norma believed me, but of course the rest of the family didn't know the depth of my interest in fish. "What does this Pommie know about a fish that has been identified as a Red Snapper by an experienced Aussie angler?" was obviously what they were all thinking but too polite to say.

 

I did not insist too vigorously, and the fish was cooked. I thought, "If I don't partake of this meal and the rest of them survive, I'll never, ever, be able to hold up my head in this family. The choice is clear – lose status or risk poisoning." I had read about the survival prospects of ciguatura victims. They were not good. I considered the probability of this particular fish being toxic. My information suggested about one chance in five. Those were odds not a lot worse than getting shot at Russian Roulette.

 

So, fatalistically, I ate one portion, but felt I could decline a second helping without losing face. We all survived.

 

After the meal, I persuaded Norma’s brother Jim to have a look at a couple of books on fish identification. Having done so, he decided, belatedly, that I had been right.

 

Jim proposed we should have a family T-shirt printed, emblazoned "We've Eaten Red Bass" and I was then formally accepted into the family as knowing a bit about fish identification!

 

Could tell y'all a story about eating puffer fish too.

 

 

RNLI Governor

 

World species 471 : UK species 105 : English species 95 .

Certhia's world species - 215

Eclectic "husband and wife combined" world species 501

 

"Nothing matters very much, few things matter at all" - Plato

...only things like fresh bait and cold beer...

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Checking out ciguatera on the web re Capt. Cook eating puffer fish in 1774 and came across this gem from an American university

http://www.mitoxic.org/pcc/healthpro/COW12A.pdf

 

Scroll down to BBQ and read the bit about Capt Cook!!!

Might have been the cause of the "Mutiny On The Bounty"

ocker-anim.gifROO.gif

 

 

Cheers, Bobj.

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I would avoid: Skanky over ripe cockles from ANY seafood stall on Weymouth beach & the smallest seafood stall in Looe - cockles should not be grey!!

 

Not to mention Parsons Pickled seafood of any description - they give you constipation & diarrhoea at the same time which is like shaking a bottle of Corona pop for an hour then not undoing the lid for 3 days - not nice ...

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Knowing my luck if I were a buddhist I'd come back as myself ...

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Crab meat that has just been cooked, and not allowed to cool down, will give you guts-ache, so I'm told.

 

Never had (or even heard of) that being a problem. Granted, most of the body meat will have been cooled due to the time it takes to get it out but claw meat is great just after taking the crab out of the cooking water.

" My choices in life were either to be a piano player in a whore house or a politician. And to tell the truth, there's hardly any difference!" - Harry Truman, 33rd US President

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Crab meat that has just been cooked, and not allowed to cool down, will give you guts-ache, so I'm told.

 

Sounds like an old wives tail - like eating bread hot from the oven will upset your stomach or eating crusts will give you curley hair.

Species caught in 2020: Barbel. European Eel. Bleak. Perch. Pike.

Species caught in 2019: Pike. Bream. Tench. Chub. Common Carp. European Eel. Barbel. Bleak. Dace.

Species caught in 2018: Perch. Bream. Rainbow Trout. Brown Trout. Chub. Roach. Carp. European Eel.

Species caught in 2017: Siamese carp. Striped catfish. Rohu. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Black Minnow Shark. Perch. Chub. Brown Trout. Pike. Bream. Roach. Rudd. Bleak. Common Carp.

Species caught in 2016: Siamese carp. Jullien's golden carp. Striped catfish. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Alligator gar. Rohu. Black Minnow Shark. Roach, Bream, Perch, Ballan Wrasse. Rudd. Common Carp. Pike. Zander. Chub. Bleak.

Species caught in 2015: Brown Trout. Roach. Bream. Terrapin. Eel. Barbel. Pike. Chub.

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