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Nosey Student

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Hello everyone,

Durham University student here who is researching the attitude of UK freshwater predator anglers towards natural and artificial baits. If you'd like to participate please say so below!

Many thanks,

Nosey Student

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Posted (edited)

Hi Nosey,

Good luck with your research.  I hope it keeps you outdoors and becomes a life vocation.  I'm just sort of breaking the ice to see if some really committed UK anglers reply "Committed UK angler" is code for "hard headed."  I am on the other side of the pond. Over here in the US in many ways, fishing with lures is akin to hunting, while bait fishing is more like trapping. In other words, the bait fisher sets out his “traps” (baited hooks) and waits for the prey to stumble upon them. In contrast, a lure  fisher can cover more water in less time. In fact, one of the "lures" that is quite popular is the bow and arrow.  Live baits FORBIDDEN IN THE UK are more popular in the US.  Most predator anglers use or have used live minnows (goldfish, etc). Minnows are only forbidden on the western slope of Colorado (The western slope drains to the Pacific Ocean - all else drain South to the Gulf of Mexico or Atlantic Ocean).

Lures seem to have the dual purpose of attracting both the fish and the fishermen's attention in the US. Sport fishing with lures is now a huge business, with over one BILLION dollars spent on fishing lures in 2018. Lures fall into several broad categories, spoons, spinners, spinnerbaits, plugs jigs, plastics both soft and hard (plastics are imitations of worms, bait fish, bottom-dwellers, and even snakes and amphibians).

We, don't feed a swim with a couple gallons of fly maggots or 10kg of meal for predators.

The sport of predator fishing is VERY heavily bias toward lures. Not so much in the number of anglers but rather Investment if fishing. Every other fisherman has a $25,000 - $50,000 boat, RODS REELS and kit collection

Phone

 

Edited by Phone

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Phone said, "The sport of predator fishing is VERY heavily bias toward lures. Not so much in the number of anglers but rather Investment if fishing. Every other fisherman has a $25,000 - $50,000 boat, RODS REELS and kit collection"

Very much so in SE Australia, targetting murray cod and yellowbelly, the 2 main species, though a few old 'die-hards' use yabbies for bait, especially for the yellowbelly. Same in 'The Top End" of the Northern Territory, The Kimberlies and northern Queensland, where the main species is the barramundi. Lures are about 98% of the fishos  arsenal, with hardbodies slowly losing out to soft plastics (costs).


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Cheers, Bobj.

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It depends on the questionnaire and the amount of personal involvement. 

Generally I use lures when I fancy a walk about, it's too cold to sit about, or the water doesn't look right where I fancied fishing. 

I tend towards deadbaits, the bait depending on the water. Some waters, trout waters for example work better on trout or part trout. Other waters inc trout waters respond to sea fish. 

If a water allows live baits, I have no problems using them.

It's really like asking how long is a piece of string or how much lead to hold bottom. Every day is different, every water different. Watercraft as in all types of fishing is what you use to catch fish, any fish.


If all else fails, follow the intructions.

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We've had a few of similar requests on here over the years, some have given more detail about the nature/aims of the research than this person has. I am very wary of giving details to these 'surveys', because I know from experience that some are just 'fishing' for information to use against angling. The use of livebaits is a very emotive subject, even amongst anglers. So unless the OP decides to offer more information about the legitimacy, and aims of their research, I for one am very reluctant to participate.

John.


Angling is more than just catching fish, if it wasn't it would just be called 'catching'......... John

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Gozzer,

certainly nothing wrong with the old school conservative approach. During the 1970's "carp surveys" were a nightmare.

Phone

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Thanks to everyone who has commented! The questionnaire should take between 15 to 20 minutes. I promise that I'm not trying to gather any "lynch the fishermen" kind of data, I was an angler before university (had to drop the hobby due to time constraints) and have developed a fondness for the aquatic environment partly due to my childhood fishing. Also this questionnaire is not focused on the use of or ethical status of livebaiting, more so the use of commercially available deadbaits. I aim to estimate the most popular forms of predator fishing within the UK as well as why anglers value certain baits over others. I hope this has cleared up some confusion!

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Posted (edited)

Hi Nosey Student - your post has made me curious, in no small part because I can see part of Durham Uni from where I'm sitting, but also in part because I was unaware that any sort of academical work even loosely related to this sort of topic went on there - its never been known as a hot-bed for scientific study 🙂 Which department / course are you studying with?

May well be interested - fished almost exclusively for predators for neck-end of 50 years 🙂

Edited by philocalist

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Oh nice, I'm at the department of Biosciences in the ecology department. I must say that this is a bit of an add on of my own design onto my wider research concerning fish passage but I thought it merited a look.

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Posted (edited)

I'm a self confessed lure nut. Everything from fly fishing a stream to chucking poppers for GT's.

I also indulge in a fair bit of bait and wait fishing, partly as a way of spending more time with my father and partly because my mobility has decreased recently due to a dodgy knee.

I spend way more on lure fishing than on bait fishing, even when I'm abroad.

One of the biggest issues for my UK lure fishing at the moment is the lack of pike due to poaching. I have gone whole seasons without hooking a pike on the middle Severn despite most of my angling being lure oriented. I now almost exclusively fish small plugs and spinners to target the chub, perch and trout in the fast, shallow water and adjust my tactics to target the perch and zander where the water is deeper and slower - or head to the coast for the bass.

I presume you are aware of the US studies looking at the economic value of recreational striper fishing, compared to commercial fishing activities.

Edited by Ken L
  • Like 1

Species caught in 2019: Pike. Bream. Tench. Chub. Common Carp. European Eel. Barbel. Bleak. Dace.

Species caught in 2018: Perch. Bream. Rainbow Trout. Brown Trout. Chub. Roach. Carp. European Eel.

Species caught in 2017: Siamese carp. Striped catfish. Rohu. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Black Minnow Shark. Perch. Chub. Brown Trout. Pike. Bream. Roach. Rudd. Bleak. Common Carp.

Species caught in 2016: Siamese carp. Jullien's golden carp. Striped catfish. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Alligator gar. Rohu. Black Minnow Shark. Roach, Bream, Perch, Ballan Wrasse. Rudd. Common Carp. Pike. Zander. Chub. Bleak.

Species caught in 2015: Brown Trout. Roach. Bream. Terrapin. Eel. Barbel. Pike. Chub.

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