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Nice things come at a cost - you only live once!!!

Go on - treat yourself to a couple.

There are no pockets in a shroud!!

Edited by Martin56

Fishin' - "Best Fun Ya' can 'ave wi' Ya' Clothes On"!!

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I thoroughly love using a centrepin for trotting on the small streams and rivers that I fish, but not in all swims; some of the swims are too full of streamer weed and cabbages to allow me to trot ver

Last year, I had a good double figure barbel (no scales with me but it was closer to 15lb than 12) from the Avon at Fladbury and that was taken (on a feeder this time) right down the side. I was

I'm not trying to teach my granny to suck eggs here, but....Chesters, your wrong bud. If fishing a parrot cage swims as you describe, you simply cast straight out (rod pointing forward, or at any

I think that those perch bobbers and American bobbers are fine if your fishing a large bait like a big lobworm or another similar sized  bait that needs supporting, but if you are not and you are fishing a smaller bait then why would you need such a large bodied float if your fishing close in along the edge??? or close in under your rod tip ??? or just a few rod lengths out ???

They are not even a good design for accurate distance casting without having to stand up and cast with all of your might and chance spooking everything in front of you that’s swimming in the surface layers 🙂

Keith

 

Edited by BoldBear
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Happiness is Fish shaped (it used to be woman shaped but the wife is getting on a bit now)

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One problem with those sliding floats is that you would have to re tackle if you wished to swap it for another one.

A normal float held on via rubbers or a adaptor can be swapped in seconds.

I would use a slider in a depth of water that required it, and where a longer rod wasn't practical, but it would have to be far less cude than those american versions in Kens links.

Edited by Tigger
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I'm with Keith and Ian, on this. Apart from the fact that I would be reluctant to buy anything described as a 'Bobber', (sorry phone), I don't think they are practical, versatile enough, and in the case of those in Martins link, much too expensive. I have plenty of floats that would do a much better job, and I could interchange them to suit, when needed.

John.

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Angling is more than just catching fish, if it wasn't it would just be called 'catching'......... John

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ALL,

You hurt my heart Gozzer.  It is a matter of getting used to one system. If you intend to change floats there is a 99% chance you are re-tackling anyway.  I don't begrudge the 'differences' but I seriously doubt one would do 'A MUCH BETTER JOB' Unless I missed something we are talking about fishing BOBBERS

Phone

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55 minutes ago, Phone said:

If you intend to change floats there is a 99% chance you are re-tackling anyway.

Not really Phone; if you are using a float adapter (for wagglers) or float rubbers (for floats attached top and bottom) then changing floats is then a simple thing to do and you only have to add or remove a shot or two.

Keith

Edited by BoldBear

Happiness is Fish shaped (it used to be woman shaped but the wife is getting on a bit now)

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When fish are actively feeding in shallow water, they generate a lot of line bites. A larger float lets you see when a fish moves off with the bait and saves a lot of striking at thin air and foul hooking. Line through construction is also very robust and unlikely to break off when playing fish in lily pads or other weed. As for casting, I rarely cast them at all, I simply drop the bait through a hole in the weeds. 

Species caught in 2020: Barbel. European Eel. Bleak. Perch. Pike.

Species caught in 2019: Pike. Bream. Tench. Chub. Common Carp. European Eel. Barbel. Bleak. Dace.

Species caught in 2018: Perch. Bream. Rainbow Trout. Brown Trout. Chub. Roach. Carp. European Eel.

Species caught in 2017: Siamese carp. Striped catfish. Rohu. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Black Minnow Shark. Perch. Chub. Brown Trout. Pike. Bream. Roach. Rudd. Bleak. Common Carp.

Species caught in 2016: Siamese carp. Jullien's golden carp. Striped catfish. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Alligator gar. Rohu. Black Minnow Shark. Roach, Bream, Perch, Ballan Wrasse. Rudd. Common Carp. Pike. Zander. Chub. Bleak.

Species caught in 2015: Brown Trout. Roach. Bream. Terrapin. Eel. Barbel. Pike. Chub.

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20 minutes ago, Ken L said:

When fish are actively feeding in shallow water, they generate a lot of line bites. A larger float lets you see when a fish moves off with the bait and saves a lot of striking at thin air and foul hooking. Line through construction is also very robust and unlikely to break off when playing fish in lily pads or other weed. As for casting, I rarely cast them at all, I simply drop the bait through a hole in the weeds. 

When fishing in a swim like you describe Ken, I would use a straight float such as a quill, or balsa, with long float rubbers that go past the ends of the float. This allows the float to pass through weed without catching on it. If possible I would fish over depth, and have a few shot positioned to keep the first few feet of line hard on the bottom, to reduce the chance of line bites, and help show a positive indication of a real bite. I've fished in streamer weed like this, fishing well over depth, with an over shotted float held back hard against the current, and shot holding the bait on the bottom. It's like an amalgamation of stret pegging, laying on, and legering, the float just indicates a bite quicker, and with less resistance than using a quivertip.  

John

Angling is more than just catching fish, if it wasn't it would just be called 'catching'......... John

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2 hours ago, Ken L said:

When fish are actively feeding in shallow water, they generate a lot of line bites. A larger float lets you see when a fish moves off with the bait and saves a lot of striking at thin air and foul hooking. Line through construction is also very robust and unlikely to break off when playing fish in lily pads or other weed. As for casting, I rarely cast them at all, I simply drop the bait through a hole in the weeds. 

Ken, I often fish a shallow estate lake, chasing big shoals of Rudd all feeding at and near the surface, and I catch a lot of these rudd (and some big Roach); either using a straight waggler (set shallow); or if they are feeding a long way out; on a small bodied ‘semi’ loaded Onion waggler and I hook quite a few of these Rudd on bites that would otherwise be missed on an insensitive bobber type of float.

Also, as for fishing through a small hole in a lilly bed; I don’t think I would fish in such a precarious situation anyway. Although I often fish right up close to lilies using standard wagglers; but not fishing into a small hole.

Theres nothing wrong with using bobber type floats, but in my view there’s no way they’re going to be as sensitive as a more convential type of float unless I’m using a much larger bait which I need to present off the bottom.

But horses for courses, everyone is different, that’s just my view.

Keith

Edited by BoldBear

Happiness is Fish shaped (it used to be woman shaped but the wife is getting on a bit now)

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10 minutes ago, BoldBear said:

Ken, I often fish a shallow estate lake, chasing big shoals of Rudd all feeding at and near the surface, and I catch a lot of these rudd (and some big Roach); either using a straight waggler (set shallow); or if they are feeding a long way out; on a small bodied ‘semi’ loaded Onion waggler and I hook quite a few of these Rudd on bites that would otherwise be missed on an insensitive bobber type of float.

Also, as for fishing through a small hole in a lilly bed; I don’t think I would fish in such a precarious situation anyway. Although I often fish right up close to lilies using standard wagglers; but not fishing into a small hole.

Theres nothing wrong with using bobber type floats, but in my view there’s no way they’re going to be as sensitive as a more convential type of float unless I’m using a much larger bait which I need to present off the bottom.

But horses for courses, everyone is different, that’s just my view.

Keith

Obviously they're not as sensitive, but when the bait is a cube of meat, aimed at carp and tench on a pool or carp and barbel on the river, things are different.

Those floats also earn a place in the box for perch fishing with livebaits - again, right in the bank

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Species caught in 2020: Barbel. European Eel. Bleak. Perch. Pike.

Species caught in 2019: Pike. Bream. Tench. Chub. Common Carp. European Eel. Barbel. Bleak. Dace.

Species caught in 2018: Perch. Bream. Rainbow Trout. Brown Trout. Chub. Roach. Carp. European Eel.

Species caught in 2017: Siamese carp. Striped catfish. Rohu. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Black Minnow Shark. Perch. Chub. Brown Trout. Pike. Bream. Roach. Rudd. Bleak. Common Carp.

Species caught in 2016: Siamese carp. Jullien's golden carp. Striped catfish. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Alligator gar. Rohu. Black Minnow Shark. Roach, Bream, Perch, Ballan Wrasse. Rudd. Common Carp. Pike. Zander. Chub. Bleak.

Species caught in 2015: Brown Trout. Roach. Bream. Terrapin. Eel. Barbel. Pike. Chub.

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